Camera Work, the 115-year-old publication, is available to be read once again…

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Alfred Stieglitz published a photographic quarterly called Camera Work
over a century ago. Original copies are rare, fragile, and very expensive.
It served as the mouthpiece for the photo-secession movement and introduced
pictorialism to the world. Not only are the photogravures beautiful, but the texts, essays,
and critiques are also worth reading. Emerging photographers, including Steichen,
Robert Demachy, Gertrude Käsebier, Clarence White, and James Craig Annan as well
as 19 th century photography pioneers Hill & Adamson, and Julia Margaret Cameron grace the pages of Camera Work. The advertisements found on the last few pages of every issue remind the reader of a bygone era of early analog photography.
Very few people or institutions own original copies of Camera Work. Each time they are
handled, the risk of damaging a piece of photography’s history is present. The greenish-
grey paper used for the cover, and the bindings are extremely friable. It is not readily
available to browse its content. The price original copies command makes it impractical
for scholars and institutions to buy and to use them as teaching tools or for reference.
The goal is to give access of its content to teachers, students, museums, libraries,
collectors, and photography history enthusiasts.

Photographer and photogravure admirer, out of town SNAP member,  Pierre Vreyen has published, for the first time, a high quality, affordable facsimile of all 50 issues. He incorporated high-resolution scans made from each original Camera Work plate and painstakingly reproduced each page as close to the original as possible. One can now read and appreciate every single page published by Alfred Stieglitz in his photographic quarterly. It took two years to digitize, clean, and color correct all 3924 pages and covers. The result of such meticulous work is a faithful facsimile publication. A bonus new issue, number 51, was created and is a table of content of all previous 50 numbers.

For more information, please visit cameraworkmagazine.com or email Pierre Vreyen at
cameraworkmagazine@gmail.com

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Live Q&A with MOMA Curator…

In celebration of National Photography Month, this month’s LIVE Q&A takes you behind the scenes on a tour of MoMA’s collection storage, where many photographs are stored, followed by a Q&A with Sarah Meister on how curators choose which photographs to acquire and display. Submit your questions in advance in the comments below, and see you on Wednesday, May 23 at 3:00 p.m. EDT. Watch live: https://youtu.be/ZXB6F51xXyY

February SNAP Notes…

Next Meeting:

Winter, at least what passes for it around here, proceeds. Personally, I shot as much, or more, during this time of year than in the summer. For a transplanted Yankee, southern summers are like northern winters: a time to stay in climate controlled environs. Since now and during the upcoming Spring is a good time for nature photography, our speaker this month is Byron Jorjorian.

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http://www.byronjorjorian.com/

“Fine art photographer, Byron Jorjorian has been capturing the natural world on film for over 30 years. He is considered by many to be one of the nation’s premier fine art nature photographers. With over 400,000 images in his files, his photographs have appeared on nationally published greeting cards, calendars, magazines, posters, murals, fine art prints, brochures, and advertising. Byron has had over 12,000 images published and more than 22,000 prints installed comprising more than 1,200 projects in various markets worldwide.”

Byron will be discussing his approach to photographing at our February meeting, Tuesday, 28th, at Dury’s, 6:30 pm. We all owe a big thank you to Dury’s and their staff for providing this facility for our meeting.

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S.N.A.P. Notes – January, 2017

The holidays are over, and now that we have had a chance to catch our collective breaths, we can get back to photography. Hope the holiday season was a joyful one for you and yours.

After a several month hiatus our January meeting will return to Dury’s, but this time at the new location at 1027 Murfreesboro Pike. We all owe a big thank you to Dury’s and it’s staff for providing this facility for our meeting. Likewise, another big thank you should go to Belmont United Methodist Church for sheltering our wondering tribe during the Dury’s move.

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1027 Murfreesboro Pike, Nashville, Tennessee
800-824-2379 • 615-255-3456
M-F 9:00 – 5:30 • Saturday 10:00 – 3:00

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Thanks also to S.N.A.P. member Richard Barrow for his November presentation, “Photography Along Our Greenways”.

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Our Provence exhibit : “Inspired by Art” is under way. If you haven’t had a chance, drop in for a look. Our Juror is Wesley Paine, Director of the Parthenon, who will join our January SNAP meeting for a conversation about her selections.

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I personally find the philosophy and taste of a juror to be enlightening about the show they curate, but also in reference to exhibits in general. Whether you have a piece in the Provence show or not, this should be a very useful presentation.

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I am pleased to announce upcoming exhibits by two S.N.A.P. members, Susan Rauch (through March) and Bill Lund (through January):

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On exhibit, “A Quiet Celebration of Rural Nolensville.” The images in this series were originally exhibited during “Slow Exposures” in Georgia last September. I am bringing the images ‘home’ to Nolensville and invite you to the Opening Reception on Thursday, Feb 2 from 4:30 – 6:30 at the Nolensville Historic School – 7248 Nolensville Rd.

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If you know of any ‘calls for entry’ or other exhibition opportunities, please let me know and I will pass them along in this publication. This month we have a posting from Aperture magazine. Please see the web site for details:

http://visitcenter.org/call-for-entries/

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Finally, I received this notice and am passing it along. I’m uncertain about whether the organization is non-profit, but my impression is of a commercial entity. As such, neither I nor S.N.A.P. endorse or recommend it. If anyone is concerned about the publication of information such as this, let me know. We can ask the club to develop a policy.

Hi Tom,

I love what SNAP is doing and wanted to pass along Avvay.com. It’s like Airbnb for creative spaces and based here in Nashville. We help people find photo locations, studios, workshops, and event spaces. Whether it’s a mansion, an empty warehouse, an old VW van, or a state-of-the-art studio – It can easily be booked. I hope you’ll check it out!

Thank you,

Jon Howard
Co-Founder
Avvay.com
jon@avvay.com